Do we prevent somebody being hurt by superstition or faith by rejecting and challenging those things? 

Is it mistaken to support organised religion in membership or donations?

If people do good because they are human, not because God prompts them then is it right to risk giving God any credit when they alone own their good?

Patrick H
Gormley


Conclusion:

The most important about thing about the most important defence of religion ever, this Handbook of Christian Apologetics, is that it knowingly tries to deceive us with arguments for religion that have been refuted aeons ago and uses trickery and manipulation to try and look believable. The authors read pro-Christian and anti-Christian works they read a lot and had to deal with objections to Christianity their whole lives so they cannot by any means be said to be simply mistaken. They brought back arguments for Christianity and God that have been refuted and buried centuries ago. They are taking full advantage of the deadly tendency in most people to believe what they read. We must ask ourselves do we really want to be part of and bring our children into a faith that depends on lies and which invites us to stupidity in order that we might believe?

 

On the bright side the book answers the hateful relativist view of religion and ethics that makes out one attitude is as good as another.  It explains that relativism such as scepticism "commits mental suicide.  It invalidates itself.  All forms of skepticism are self-contradictory, in the last analysis.  They all amount to saying that it is true that there is no truth, or that we can know that we cannot know, or we can be certain that we cannot be certain, or it is a universal truth that there are no universal truths, or you can be quite dogmatic about the fact that you can't be dogmatic, or it is an absolute that there are no absolutes, or it is an objective truth that there is no objective truth."